Interview with John Grey

This is one of an ongoing series of interviews with contributors to The 3288 Review.

John Grey is an Australian poet, US resident. Recently published in New Plains Review, Perceptions and Sanskrit with work upcoming in South Carolina Review, Gargoyle, Owen Wister Review and Louisiana Literature. His poems “And the Answer Is…” and “Carolyn Drowned” appeared in the Autumn 2015 issue of The 3288 Review.

# # #

3288 Review: How and when did you start writing? Was there a specific event or moment which sparked your interest in the written word?

John Grey: I started scribbling words on blanks pieces of paper (and some not so blank) from as far back as I remember. And my interest in the written word (by others at least) stems from the first time I started reading. My birthdays and Christmas, from the beginning, were more about accumulating books than toys. i did start trying to write poems and songs and even a few small plays in my teens and then by my twenties became much more serious about it. Continue reading →

Interview with Chris Dungey

This is one of an ongoing series of interviews with contributors to The 3288 Review.

Chris Dungey is a retired auto worker living in Lapeer, MI. He spends his days mountain biking, feeding two wood stoves, singing in a Presbyterian choir, watching English football, camping at sports-car races, and spending too much time in Starbucks. He has over 50 story credits. He has been published recently in Marathon Literary Review, whimperbang, Madcap Review, Literary Commune (UK), Door is a Jar, and Aethlon (Wright State University), and has work forthcoming in Sediments Literary Arts. His short story “Slice” appeared in our second issue in November 2015.

# # #

3288 Review: How and when did you start writing? Was there a specific event or moment which sparked your interest in the written word?

Chris Dungey: I actually began writing journalism in high school, Imlay City Community High School in Lapeer County. There was a student newspaper, printed locally at the shop of the Imlay City Times. We tried to publish every two or three weeks. We did our own layout, chose and measured print for headlines, sold ads. Any visit to the shop exposed one to the loud clatter of the old Linotype machine and the ink-stained veteran newsies who worked there. I did not dabble in fiction until I was in college at St. Clair County Community College. But the impetus to write, the seminal event, would have to have been reading Hemingway’s “Big Two-Hearted River” in eighth grade. I am someone who cannot simply enjoy a thing without attempting to emulate it. With regards to that particular classic, I’ve probably fallen well short. Continue reading →

Interview with Chila Woychik

This is one of an ongoing series of interviews with contributors to The 3288 Review.

German-born author and editor Chila Woychik is at home hiking in adjacent woods or regarding coyote calls at night. Her literary efforts have been acknowledged by Emrys Journal (forthcoming), Pithead Chapel, Stoneboat, Prick of the Spindle, and others. She occupies the near-space of another human and keeps numerous animals, including sheep and ducks, just outside her windows. Her lyric essay “A Place Called Place: Surrounds” appeared in our Autumn 2015 issue.

# # #

3288 Review: How and when did you start writing? Was there a specific event or moment which sparked your interest in the written word?

Chila Woychik: As a child, I learned both German and English, having been born to a German mother and American father. Even though the bilingualism of everyday life changed for me once we reached America, my parents still spoke to each other in German on occasion, and from that, I believe, I glimpsed the nuances and beauty of spoken language. My childhood books were a dictionary and a set of encyclopedias, beyond what we received from our small town Illinois schools, and I relished each new section, each new word, as I moved through the entire set. I wrote my first poem in third grade; it was about spring, of course, and probably birds. In high school, I took every English, “office,” and writing class I could and loved every single one of them, in large part due to our fantastic teacher, Elaine Lowry. Then I set aside creative diversity for a while but took it up again at 34 after surgery on a herniated back disc. Again another long lull in serious creative pursuits.  It wasn’t until 2013 that I discovered the literary journal market, so I’m definitely a late-emerging writer to this scene. The thing, person, who nudged me to finally and irrevocably cultivate literary writing was Annie Dillard’s book Holy the Firm. I read it and something died inside, while something else sprang wonderfully to life, something far far better. Continue reading →