Interview with E.E. King

This is one of an ongoing series of interviews with contributors to The 3288 Review.

E.E. King is a performer, writer, biologist and painter. Ray Bradbury calls her stories “marvelously inventive, wildly funny and deeply thought provoking. I cannot recommend them highly enough.” Her books include Dirk Quigby’s Guide to the Afterlife, Real Conversations with Imaginary Friends and Another Happy Ending. She has won numerous awards and been published widely. She has worked with children in Bosnia, crocodiles in Mexico, frogs in Puerto Rico, egrets in Bali, mushrooms in Montana, archaeologists in Spain and butterflies in South Central Los Angeles. Her short story “The Grammarian’s Grimoire” was published in our Autumn 2015 issue.

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3288 Review: How and when did you start writing? Was there a specific event or moment which sparked your interest in the written word?

E.E. King: I wrote when I was very young, but left the pen, and computer, to pursue ballet, theater, painting and biology. About 2002 when I began writing seriously, daily. I was extraordinarily fortunate to have Ray Bradbury as my champion and mentor. He had been in my father’s writing group and I visited him weekly for many years until his death. His greeting was always, “Have you written today?” I can still hear him saying; “I am your Rabbi and your Priest. This is your temple. Now go forth and WRITE!” I have always been a vociferous reader, and I was lucky to have grown up being read to and told stories. I began by writing a children’s book—a story and novel. Then I wrote stories—hundreds of stories—before moving on novels. Continue reading →

Interview with Jean Davis

This is one of an ongoing series of interviews with contributors to The 3288 Review.

Jean Davis lives in West Michigan. When not writing, she can be found playing in her garden, enjoying a glass of wine, or lost a good book. Her novel A Broken Race is now available, and her short fiction has appeared in Bards and Sages Quarterly, Acidic Fiction, Tales of The Talisman, The First Line, Allegory, Isotropic Fiction, Liquid Imagination, and more. Upcoming publications include two short fiction stories in Caffeinated PressBrewed Awakenings II anthology. Follow her writing adventures at www.jeanddavis.blogspot.com. Her story “Kick the Cat” appeared in Issue 1.2 in November 2015.

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3288 Review: How and when did you start writing? Was there a specific event or moment which sparked your interest in the written word?

Jean Davis: If we’re to go back to the spark, I’d have to say it was my fourth and fifth grade history teacher who accepted my short stories on the sly and wrote encouraging comments on them, sneaking them back to me tucked between my regular assignments. I don’t recall exactly how we came to this secret arrangement, but the fact that she wasn’t an English teacher, so there wasn’t that pressure, and that she was an adult who liked what I wrote, was very exciting.

I wrote on an off, more so in high school and into my early twenties. And then I had kids. I spent most of their year early years plugging away at various major rewrites on a single novel as time allowed, which if you have young kids and a job, you understand is about ten minutes a week in a state somewhere between exhaustion and asleep.

It wasn’t until 2005 that I found my way to fan fiction where I again got a taste of feedback and encouragement, not that those two things were often hand in hand or very helpful. The search for more productive criticism led me to a critique group. There, I started writing seriously and learned a lot. I’m still learning a lot, seven years later. Continue reading →

Interview with Joe Baumann

This is one of an ongoing series of interviews with contributors to The 3288 Review.

Joe Baumann received his Ph.D. in English from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, where he served as the editor-in-chief of Rougarou: an Online Literary Journal and the Southwestern Review.  He is the author of Ivory Children: Flash Fictions, and his work has appeared in Tulane Review, Willow Review, Hawai’i Review, and many others, and is forthcoming in Jelly Bucket, Lunch Ticket and others. He teaches composition, literature and creative writing at St. Charles Community College in St. Charles, Missouri. Baumann’s story “The House on the Edge of the Canyon” appeared in issue 1.2 of The 3288 Review.

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3288 Review: How and when did you start writing? Was there a specific event or moment which sparked your interest in the written word?

Joe Baumann: I can’t remember the exact moment at which I started writing stories, but I have a distinct memory of writing something in first grade. I was living in New York, and in elementary school we had a program—looking back, it feels like magic that this was a thing the school could do—where every student was asked to write a short book that would be published as a hardback. I have little memory of what that book was about (I’m sure my parents have it shelved away somewhere), and I don’t distinctly remember having a deep love of writing before that, but perhaps that’s because I have a very blurry sense of my memory before that moment (my first five years of life are spotty and bleary, as young memories tend to be). That, however, was certainly a major starting point for me. Being able to hold, in my hands, my own work, made me feel immediately empowered as a writer, even at that age. I had been a reader for all of my childhood—I devoured Goosebumps, The Boxcar Children, and the Clue books, even at that age—and somewhere inside, consciously or unconsciously, having that item in my hands made me feel ready to be a part of that world. The rest, I suppose, is history. Continue reading →